1099-MISC

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Do I Have to Issue 1099s for “Business to Business Transactions”?

By | October 17th, 2019|Categories: Small Business Tax and Accounting|Tags: , |

(NOTE: I have been terrible about writing posts this year; I am finally back at a point of being able to blog again, so you'll see posts more often from me. And if this post is any indication, I have my flair back that so many people liked, of writing with humor and going on long [...]

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Do Landlords Need to Issue 1099s? An In-Depth Look, Part 1

By | December 13th, 2018|Categories: Small Business Tax and Accounting|Tags: , |

Question: does a landlord need to issue 1099s to contractors who perform work on the landlord's property? Answer: I give a CPE presentation on Form 1099, and I've also done far more research into 1099s (especially 1099-MISC) than any sane person should. And I can say, I have an opinion on the answer to this question [...]

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Glossary: 1099

By | June 12th, 2017|Categories: Glossary|Tags: , , , |

In the tax world, the term "1099" refers to a series of reporting forms issued to recipients of certain types of income.

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Issue a 1099 to a Hotel for Rent Expense?

By | October 10th, 2016|Categories: Small Business Tax and Accounting|Tags: , |

The question posed to me was: if we rent a conference room from a hotel, do we need to issue a 1099 to the hotel to report the amount of fees paid? My knee-jerk reaction was to say no, because renting a conference room isn’t really a “rent expense” as in an office lease. An office lease would need reported on a 1099, but renting a conference room wouldn’t be. But I never felt 100% confident in that answer.

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Basics of Taxes, Part 5: Income From Other States, And Other Complications

By | May 19th, 2016|Categories: Potpourri of Tax Topics|Tags: , |

If you worked in more than one state, you might have a filing obligation in the state where you’re a resident, and in the state you worked in.