Dinesen Tax Greatest Hits — 6 Tax Predictions for 2012

Since it’s a holiday week, I’m taking the easy way out and posting some of the most popular blog stories of all-time. Today, this popular story in which I offer up my 6 tax predictions for 2012. Since we still have almost 4 full months left in the year, I’ll refrain from offering commentary on how accurate my predictions were until we reach the end of December.

—–

Originally published December 30, 2011

Here are my predictions for what we can expect in the tax world in 2012: 

  1. Congress will extend the “2-month” payroll tax cut for the rest of the year. They will probably do this with much drama in the last few days of February.
  2. No tax reform will take place this year. It’s an election year so neither party will want to put forth anything that might rock the boat.
  3. Once the elections are over, Congress will execute its favorite play — the punt — by extending the “Bush Tax Cuts” for another year or two. This will probably happen, with much drama, right before Christmas.
  4. Most of the tax provisions that expire 12/31/11 (such as the AMT patch) will be extended along with the Bush Tax Cuts.
  5. Along with extending the Bush Tax Cuts and other tax provisions into 2013, Congress will either a) extend the payroll tax cut into 2013 or b) let the payroll tax cut expire but replace it with some other gimmick tax break.
  6. IRS efforts to regulate preparers will not have the desired effect, in 2012 or beyond. I think the result of this bureaucracy that is being created is that more burdens and annoyances will be placed on preparers, with no discernible benefit to consumers.*

*-Clarification to #6 based on reader feedback — I do think preparer regulation is good in theory. I just really question if the IRS can execute the oversight effectively. I’ll write more on this in a future blog post.

I’ll bring this post up again at this time next year to see how accurate my predictions were.

Image: luigi diamanti / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

“This blog post, along with comments that may follow, should not be considered tax advice. Before you make final tax or financial decisions, please secure a professional tax advisor to give you advice about your unique situation. To secure Jason as your accountant, please click on the ‘Services’ link at the top of the page.”

Extend the Conversation Outward.

One way to extend this conversation is to post your thoughts and a link to this post to platforms like Twitter, Facebook or Google Plus. Thank you...