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As introduced in Part 1, Iowa allows an exclusion of up to $12,000 of pension/retirement account income for taxpayers age 55 and older. When married taxpayers file separate tax returns, the $12,000 exclusion might need to be allocated.

Let’s go through a few scenarios.

Scenario 1: Both spouses are over age 55 and both have pension income.

In this scenario, the $12,000 exclusion is allocated based on each spouse’s ratio of pension income. For example, if one spouse has pension income of $10,000 and the other has pension income of $5,000 (so combined they have $15,000 of pension income), the spouse with $10,000 of pension income will claim two-thirds of the exclusion; the spouse with $5,000 of pension income will claim one-third of the exclusion.

Scenario 2: Both spouses are over age 55 but only one of them has pension income

In this scenario, the spouse with the pension income will take the entire exclusion. Note that the exclusion is capped the lesser of: $12,000 or the actual amount of pension income. So if the spouse in this scenario had, say, $8,000 of pension income, they’d get an $8,000 pension exclusion.

Scenario 3: One spouse is over 55, the other under 55; spouse over age 55 has pension income

In this scenario, the couple still gets a $12,000 pension exclusion, which will be claimed by the spouse who’s over age 55.

Scenario 4: One spouse is over 55, the other under 55; the spouse under age 55 has pension income.

In this scenario, the couple doesn’t qualify for the exclusion because the spouse who’s under age 55 has pension income. This couple will get zero ($0) as a pension exclusion.

“This blog post, along with comments that may follow, should not be considered tax advice. Before you make final tax or financial decisions, please secure a professional tax advisor to give you advice about your unique situation. To secure Jason as your accountant, please click on the ‘Services’ link at the top of the page.”